Dec 10, 2020

Digital Realty: Data Gravity Intensity impacts APAC metros

datacenter
DigitalRealty
APAC
Cloud
Georgia Wilson
3 min
Data Gravity Index DGx™ v1.5 from Digital Realty identifies Jakarta, Singapore, Hong Kong, Melbourne as Metros with Greatest Data Gravity Intensities
Data Gravity Index DGx™ v1.5 from Digital Realty identifies Jakarta, Singapore, Hong Kong, Melbourne as Metros with Greatest Data Gravity Intensities...

Digital Realty, a global provider of cloud- and carrier-neutral data center, colocation and interconnection solutions, has published version 1.5 of its Data Gravity Index DGx™. The latest study covers 53 global metros and assesses the intensity and gravitational force of enterprise growth data on 23 industries.

“As businesses undergo the rapid pace of digital transformation, understanding the impact of data gravity intensity will be a fundamental requirement for both enterprises and service providers to unlock data-driven opportunities,” said Tony Bishop, SVP, Platform, Growth and Marketing at Digital Realty.

“Data gravity is an impediment to enterprise growth that will affect businesses across industries around the world. The release of our Data Gravity Index DGx 1.5 exploring the impact of data gravity across more metros and key industries is designed to help enterprises develop a data-centric architecture as they combat digital transformation challenges.”

The index analyzed Global 2000 enterprise companies’ presence in each metro, along with GDP, population, number of employees, technographics, IT spend, average bandwidth and latency, as well as flows of data. Digital Realty conducted research between August 2019 and August 2020 and drew upon third-party data sources – including the World Economic Forum and United Nations, as well as consulting and market research firms.  

Data Gravity’s Growing Impact on Key Industries

The industries expected to experience the greatest data gravity intensity include banking and financial services, manufacturing and insurance, all of which are expected to see rapid growth in digital acceleration, digital-enabled interactions and data exchange volumes globally.  

Key findings across Forbes Global 2000 enterprises include:

• Data gravity intensity for banking and financial services firms will be exacerbated by regional growth in key banking and financial hubs.

• Large manufacturers are expanding their data and analytics capabilities, driven by the growth of in-home consumption.  

• The insurance industry is expected to see data gravity intensify as digital-enabled interactions continue to increase in importance while key metros experience rapid growth in the volume of enterprise data exchange.  

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Regional Forecasts for New Global Metros

According to the expanded report, Jakarta, Indonesia is expected to generate the fastest growth in data gravity intensity, followed by Singapore, Rome, Hong Kong, Melbourne and Atlanta.

In addition, banking and financial services centres (such as London, New York, Tokyo, Paris, Hong Kong, Amsterdam, Beijing, Silicon Valley, Frankfurt, Toronto, Singapore, Washington, Charlotte, Sydney, Milan and Seoul) are expected to realise significant growth in the volume of enterprise data exchange.  

“Data gravity continues to accelerate unabated, and so does the urgency of addressing it,” said Dave McCrory, VP of Growth, Head of Insights & Analytics at Digital Realty. “We are expanding the findings of our Data Gravity Index to include an analysis of 23 industries and 32 additional metros to provide insights to help business leaders make better strategic decisions about where to locate their data.”  

Digital Realty supports the world’s leading enterprises and service providers by delivering the full spectrum of data center, colocation and interconnection solutions. Digital Realty’s global data center footprint consists of more than 280 facilities in 49 metros across 24 countries on six continents.

READ the full report 

For more information on business topics in Asia Pacific, Australia and New Zealand, please take a look at the latest edition of Business Chief APAC.

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Jul 30, 2021

First Solar to Invest US$684mn in Indian Energy Sector

FirstSolar
Energy
Manufacturing
India
3 min
First Solar will launch an advanced PV manufacturing plant in Tamil Nadu to support Indian solar independence

First Solar is about to set up a new photovoltaic (PV) thin-film solar manufacturing facility in Tamil Nadu, India. The 3.3GW factory will create 1,000 skilled jobs and is expected to launch its operations in Q3 of 2023. According to the company, India needs 25+ gigawatts of solar energy to be deployed each year for the next nine years. This means that many of First Solar’s Indian clients will jump at the chance to have access to the company’s advanced PV. 

 

Said Mark Widmar, First Solar’s CEO: ‘India is an attractive market for First Solar not simply because our module technology is advantageous in its hot, humid climate. It’s an inherently sustainable market, underpinned by a growing economy and appetite for energy’. 

A Bit of Background 

First Solar is a leading global provider of photovoltaic systems. It uses advanced technology to generate clear, reliable energy around the world. And even though it’s headquartered in the US, the company has invested in storage facilities around the world. It displaced energy requirements for a desalination plant in Australia, launched a source of reliable energy in the Middle East (Dubai, UAE), and deployed over 4.5GW of energy across Europe with its First Solar modules

 

The company is also known for its solar innovation, reporting that it sees gains in efficiency three times faster than multi-crystalline silicon technology. First Solar holds world records in thin-film cell conversion efficiency (22.1%) and module conversion efficiency (18.2%). Finally, it helps its partners develop, finance, design, construct, and operate PV power plants—which is exactly what we’re talking about. 

How Will The Tamil Nadu Plant Work?

Tamil Nadu will use the same manufacturing template as First Solar’s new Ohio factory. According to the Times of India, the factory will combine skilled workers, artificial intelligence, machine-to-machine communication, and IoT connectivity. In addition, its operations will adhere to First Solar’s Responsible Sourcing Solar Principles, produce modules with a 2.5x lower carbon footprint, and help India become energy-independent. Said Widmar: ‘Our advanced PV module will be made in India, for India’. 

 

After all, we must mention that part of First Solar’s motivation in Tamil Nadu is to ensure that India doesn’t rely on Chinese solar. ‘India stands apart in the decisiveness of its response to China’s strategy of state-subsidised global dominance of the crystalline silicon supply chain’, Widmar explained. ‘That’s precisely the kind of level playing field needed for non-Chinese solar manufacturers to compete on their own merits’. 

 

According to First Solar, India’s model should be a template for like-minded nations. Widmar added: ‘We’re pleased to support the sustainable energy ambitions of a major US ally in the Asia-Pacific region—with American-designed solar technology’. To sum up: Indian solar power is yet the next development in the China-US trade war. Let the PV manufacturing begin. 

 

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