May 19, 2020

Top 10 fastest growing companies in Australia

Top 10
Andrew Woods
4 min
Top 10 fastest growing companies in Australia

10. Connected Analytics (three-year year-on-year (YoY) growth 102.5%)

Connected Analytics is a privately owned and registered Australian company that posted a 2016 revenue of $4.01mn. A professional services business dedicated to helping organisations use information to gain insight and make better decisions, Connected Analytics uses a business model based on ‘an absolute commitment to delivery excellence and to an employment proposition that provides our clients with access to some of the best talent in our industry’.

http://www.connectedanalytics.com.au/

 

9. JV Recruitment (3-year YoY growth 103.8%)

JV recruitment was founded in 2009 and reported its 2016 revenue as $14mn. The company provides a people-orientated approach to recruitment in the areas of construction, logistics, manufacturing and business support. It recruits across permanent, contract and labour hire staffing solutions and boasts a 96% placement success rate, with 60-80 labour assignments per day. It is currently directed by the company founder, Stuart Campbell, and is headquartered in Melbourne.

https://www.facebook.com/jvrecruitment/

https://twitter.com/JVrecruitment_

https://www.linkedin.com/company/jv-recruitment-pty-ltd/

 

8. Reliance Real Estate (three-year YoY growth 108.8%)

Reliance Real Estate has been established as an independently owned and operated company in the Wyndham area with offices based in Werribee, Point Cook, Melton, and Tarneit office. It’s been around since 2011 when it had just four employees. Reliance has grown rapidly since and now has over 60 staff and a 2016 revenue of $4.67mn.

https://www.facebook.com/RelianceRealEstateWerribee

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCO8bvXCwzcFQna11cldxM7w

https://www.linkedin.com/in/sunil-kumar-6a046349/

https://plus.google.com/105115774822664150022

 

7 Hunter Mason (three-year YoY growth 118.6%)

Hunter Mason is a five-year-old construction management consultancy company headquartered in Sydney. The company delivers fitout and refurbishment services to the real estate industry and reported a 2016 revenue of $29.93mn. Owner Matthew Callender manages a team of over 20 and the company has notable partners including Accenture, Uber and Vodafone. Its most recent clients have also included booking.com, Jacobs and Qantas.

http://huntermason.com.au/

https://www.linkedin.com/company/7753834/

https://www.instagram.com/huntermason_pty_ltd/

 

6. MYdeal.com (three-year YoY growth 124%)

MyDeal.com.au is an Australian online retail marketplace, connecting millions of consumers with thousands of Australian retailers since 2011 with over 2mn parcels shipped nationwide. The homeware and fashion site currently sells over 100,000 items and posted $29.55mn in revenue for 2016.

www.mydeal.com.au/

https://www.facebook.com/mydealaustralia/

https://twitter.com/mydealaustralia

https://plus.google.com/+MyDealAu

https://www.pinterest.com.au/mydealaustralia/

https://www.instagram.com/mydealaustralia/

 

5. Alegre (three-year YoY growth 127.7%)

Electronics trade-in specialists Alegre have been capitalising on the used smartphone and tablet market since 2012 and posted a 2016 revenue of $27.9mn. The Alegre Trade In programme delivers an enterprising buyback solution described as ‘market leading’.

http://www.alegre.net.au/

https://www.facebook.com/BoomerangBuyback/

 

4. Evolution Health (three-year YoY growth 129.1%)

Evolution Health is a family owned Australian company established in 2006 which posted a 2016 revenue of $71.85mn. Evolution is a brand owner, manufacturer and supplier of a range of nutritional health supplements and products. Building on more than 20 years of manufacturing expertise in therapeutic products through sister company Ultra Mix, Evolution Health is a vibrant new player in the health and complementary medicine industry for the Australian and global marketplace.

http://www.evolutionhealth.com.au/

 

3. Octopus Deploy (three-year YoY growth 133.3%)

Octopus Deploy is the most popular deployment automation server in the world with over 20,000 companies using its Octopus to automate NET, Java and other application deployments to their servers. It has achieved 12mn deployments to date and over 220,000 machines are running its service, Tentacle. 2016 saw Octopus post a revenue of $8.61mn.

www.octopus.com

https://twitter.com/OctopusDeploy

https://github.com/OctopusDeploy

https://www.youtube.com/c/Octopusdeploy

 

2. Prospa (three-year YoY growth unreported)

Australia’s number one lender to small businesses for loans up to $250,000, Prospa has provided funds totalling $500mn. Prospa offers business loans of between $5,000 and $250,000 with no security required to access up to $100,000. Application takes just 10 minutes and clients can get same day approval. Funding is possible within 24 hours. Using a smart proprietary technology platform, Prospa focuses on the health of a business to determine its credit-worthiness. Its 2016 revenue was $56.36mn.

https://www.prospa.com/

 

1.TripADeal (three-year YoY growth unreported)

TripADeal is Australia’s most popular online travel company which makes ‘travel dreams come true by offering bucket list adventures at unbelievable prices’. Voted Best Online Travel Agency 2017 by the National Travel Industry, its growing team of travel experts are all based in Byron Bay on the east coast. TripaADeal posted a 2016 revenue of $89.88mn

www.tripadeal.com.au

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Jun 13, 2021

Seo JungJin: Who is EY’s World Entrepreneur of 2021?

EY
entrepreneurs
Leadership
celltrion
Kate Birch
3 min
From just US$45,000 capital in 2003 to a world-leading biopharma giant with revenues of US$1.69bn today, Seo JungJin is crowned EY World Entrepreneur 2021

Seo JungJin, founder of biopharma firm Celltrion, which most recently developed an antibody treatment for COVID-19, has been named the EY World Entrepreneur of the Year 2021, becoming the first South Korean in the award’s 21-year history.

Regarded as one of the world’s most prestigious business awards program for entrepreneurs, the EY Entrepreneur of the Year celebrates visionary and innovative leaders from across 60 countries who are transforming the world and fostering growth.

JungJin, who is now honoroary chairman of Celltrion Group, was up against a worthy cast of entrepreneurial competitors, taking the crown from among 45 award winners across 38 countries and territories.

Speaking during the virtual event, JungJin described his own interpretation of entrepreneurship as something that brings together “a group of people toward a common vision, embracing challenges as opportunities and committing oneself to contribute to the greater good”.

Why was JungJin crowned King Entrepreneur?

A South Korean native and now 63 years of age, JungJin founded biopharmaceutical firm Celltrion in 2003. In the nearly two decades since its founding, Celltrion has lived up to its goal of advancing health and welfare for all by developing ground-breaking drugs to treat autoimmune disease, various forms of cancer and, most recently, COVID-19.

The company, which JungJin started with just US$45,000 and five of his colleagues, has since growth to more than 2,1000 employees with sales permits in more than 90 countries and revenues exceeding US$1.69bn.

According to the panel, JungJin’s story is a shining example of the power of an unstoppable entrepreneur to change the world with the pandel moved by both his incredible story and his purpose-driven leadership, innovative mindset and entrepreneurial spirit.

Described by the chair of the EY judging panel Rosaleen Blair as “representing everything an unstoppable should be” from taking on the world’s biggest health care challenges to consistently creating long-term value for his company, JungJin’s story is one of incredible tenacity and perseverance that the judging panel felt most represented the entrepreneurial spirit.

“He’s taken breathtaking risks, both personal and professional, to found Celltrion and grow it into one of the world’s leading biopharmaceutical companies,” says Stasia Mitchell, EY Global Entrepreneurship Leader. “His passion for creating affordable, life-saving health care and flair for tackling global problems has led to many treatments that have helped millions of people worldwide and was especially evident this past year through the creation of a COVID-19 antibody treatment.”

How did JungJin get there?

JungJin's entrepreneurial journey started at an early age when he worked as a taxi driver to get himself through Konkuk University in Seoul, South Korea. After studying industrial engineering, he rose through the ranks of Daewoo Motor Co. before losing his job amid the carmaker’s financial troubles following the 1997 Asian economic crisis.

Following this, JungJin started collaborating with colleagues to explore business opportunities in different industries, though none delivered lasting success. The turning point came after he attended a talk hosted by renowned scholars, which inspired him to focus on the biopharmaceutical sector.

And so he founded Celltrion with just US$45,000 of his savings. The launch of Remsima, credited with being the world's first antibody biosimilar, quickly moved Celltrion up the ranks of the country's fairly underdeveloped pharmaceutical sector. Celltrion followed this success with the launch of drugs for breast cancer and lymphoma that today are being used worldwide.

With ambitions to be the world’s first in different areas, Celltrion has pioneered numerous uncharted areas to great success over the past two decades, most recently responding to the global pandemic by successfully developing an antibody treatment for COVID-19 and working to ensure a timely supply of the safe and effective treatment.

“When I first started, my vision was to help patients gain access to safe, effective and affordable medicines and thereby enhance the quality of people’s lives,” explains JungJin. “The success of Celltrion has enabled me to expand on this while finding new ways to fuel my entrepreneurial drive.”

 

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