May 19, 2020

Australian construction leaders gather in Queensland to address industry issues

Queensland Building and Construction Commission
Australian construction industry
Annual Construction Law Conference
Addie Thomes
2 min
Australian construction leaders gather in Queensland to address industry issues

McCullough Robertson’s 17th Annual Construction Law Conference, one of the leading construction events in Australia, held in Queensland, will see industry heavyweights discuss and debate the future of the sector.

Despite a recent rebound, it’s been a tough time for the $44bn industry as market conditions deteriorate and proposed reforms create increased uncertainty and division across the sector.

Queensland Building and Construction Commission (QBCC) Commissioner Brett Bassett will shed much-needed light on the industry’s most poignant issues in a panel discussion at the event, to be held on 14 September.

RELATED STORIES:

More than 240 builders, engineers, contractors, sub-contractors and project leads from all corners of Queensland and New South Wales are expected at Rydges South Bank for a full run-down on recent and proposed reforms around non-conforming building products, security of payment, licensing, and compliance with workplace health and safety requirements.

Attendees will include representatives from Hutchinson Builders, Downer, FKG, Sandvik, Broadspectrum, Grocon, Department of Transport and Main Roads, Brisbane City Council, Department of Public Works, James Cook University, Sunshine Coast University, Georgiou and Telstra.

Other speakers include McCullough Robertson strategic advisers Michael Roche and Graham Cox who will comment on the state of the resources sector and opportunities on offer in the renewables space.

McCullough Robertson Partner Ren Niemann will comment in response to the constraints on government budgets and the need for priority infrastructure projects to progress.

Saddled with legislative uncertainty, Queensland’s building, construction and engineering sector is still coming to grips with the end of the mining and LNG boom, which delivered a healthy $70bn over six years.

Share article